Informaticopia

Friday, June 30, 2006

OpenSource Tech. in Medical Informatics!! How to??


blogs , CMSs , Forums , Wiki s , Galleries , eLearning , GroupWare , Hospital Manag system ,............etc

some comments about medical matter got this thought "I don’t think we utilize the power of computers nearly enough in this area" form another Computerist and health informatics watcher too..

Yas We don`t utilize the power of Opensource tech as we should . yet in Health and Medical informatics ... altho it`s
  • Free :- GPL , lGPL , BSDGPL
  • Opensource :- Re-Writable enabled. re-coding and re-programming
  • Many Minds - May Thoughts - more system powerfull
  • Plugins and addon systems .. available
  • MultiLingual support
  • ...................................................................etc.
example for CMS could use as medical portal :-
Podcasting Blog How too??
i write alittle post about that
loudblog-publish-a-real-valid-podcasting-feed-mediablog

ScreenShot :- Admin your Podcasts

dealing with this open source tech?

  • some of those stuff could istall easy with easy interface for the admin panal .. and more Flexibility to control the content and how to view this content ..

Hamza Mousa


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Involve nurses in IT input

Involve nurses in IT input - Comment - Times Online

A letter to the Times (27th June) by Richard Hayward - Chair, British Computer Society Health Informatics (Nursing) Specialist Group and Professor Dame June Clark -Chair, RCN Information in Nursing Forum, about the lack of involvement of the nursing (including midwifery and health visiting) community in the design and preparation for the programme, has been picked up by EHealth Insider.

The EHI story Lack of NPfIT involvement concerns nurses links this with a recent editorial in Nursing Times, which protested at the news that community nurses are well down the schedule to receive help from the Primis Plus, the service funded by Connecting for Health to help primary care organisations improve patient care through the effective use of their clinical computer systems.

Comments on the issues raised can be made on the EHI page.

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NAO: The challenge of objectivity - IT Management\Politics & Law - 26/Jun/2006

ComputerWeekly.com - NAO: The challenge of objectivity - IT Management\Politics & Law - 26/Jun/2006

Interesting piece in Computer Weekly suggesting that the National Audit Office had some serious challenges in the preparation of ti's report into the NHS National Porgramme for IT (NPfIT).

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Wednesday, June 28, 2006

Research Councils UK: Open Access Position Announcement

Research Councils UK: Open Access Position Announcement

Today the Research Council UK, published an updated position paper on improved access to research outputs. RCUK is funded by taxpayers money through the Science Budget of the governments Office of Science and Innovation. They are incorporated by Royal Charter and together manage a research budget of over £2.5 billion a year.

The paper reaffirms the Research Councils' commitment to the guiding principles that publicly funded research must be made available and accessible for public examination as rapidly as practical; published research outputs should be effectively peer-reviewed; this must be a cost effective use of public funds; and outputs must be preserved and remain accessible for future generations. However, the RCUK Executive Group has made nojudgmentt as to the most appropriate publishing model.

The position statement covers two aspects of the changing publication landscape; Author-pays publishing and Self-archiving.

It appears that they have held back from the demands made by many, that open access publishing should be required, however will require deposition of articles and research outputs in a repository as designated by the individual research council - although there is no indication of what these may be or who will be running them - although the response to the statement by JISC gives some good indications eg UK PubMed Central.

The importance of quality assurance procedures through peer review are recognised and should remainundiminishedd by this announcement.

Work still needed is to discuss with interested learned societies, the implications for them of self-archiving, and consulting regarding copyright and licensing issues.

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BMJ debate about consent and electronic health records

This weeks British Medical Journal (23rd June) contains 2 editorials, a For and Against piece and several "rapid feedbacks" which contribute to debates around the NHS national Programme for IT and specifically the opt-in v opt-out debates about the inclusion and sharing of information held within the electronic health record.

An editorial by Justin Keen "The NHS programme for information technology" describes it as a massive natural experiment which needs evaluating and regulating which comments on the recent report by the National Audit Office and suggests it is not surprising there are problems with identifying benefits from the programme and makes a strong case for taking advantage of the opportunity for the collection of observational evidence about the costs, risks, and benefits of large scale investments in information technology.

Another editorial by Ole Frithjof Northeim "Soft paternalism and the ethics of shared electronic patient records" considers whether it is ethically sound for patients to opt out. It uses examples of "soft paternalism" (accepting the default policy of "opt-out", preserves freedom of choice and promoted health and welfare for all.

A related "For and against" piece Patients should have to opt out of national electronic care records includes 3 short papers related to the opt out. Nigel Watson presents models of patient consent based on the Hampshire and Isle of Wight experience, concluding that "we should adopt an opt-out approach for contributing information to the NHS care record service but obtain consent, or have a legitimate clinical relationship with the patient, to access the clinical records. It will be essential, however, to have a large publicity campaign six months before the start of the service, detailing to patients what is going to happen, the potential benefits and dangers, and most importantly how they can opt out of having their records shared." John D Halamka presents an opposing view based on US experience suggesting the risk of opting out may be greater than the benefits. A patients perspective is offered by Jan Wilkinson who can't see what all the fuss is about.

The BMJ enables "rapid responses" which are also included on the web site - responses within the first few days included; The NHS Care Records Dilemma by Maureen A Orlando , Patient records, confidentiality and choice by Michael Foley and "Opt in" v. "Opt Out" by Paul Thornton - which are useful in progressing the debates.

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Tuesday, June 27, 2006

Medical Informatics and the Internet in Medicine

IngentaConnect Table Of Contents: Medical Informatics and the Internet in Medicine

The latest edition 31:2 (June 2006) of Medical Informatics and the Internet in Medicine has just been made available online. The table of contents includes:

TI: Mobile healthcare informatics
AU: Siau, Keng; Shen, Zixing

TI: A semantically enabled formalism for the knowledge management of Parkinson's disease
AU: Paul, S.; Kokossis, A.; Gage, H.; Storey, L.; Lawrenson, R.; Trend, P.; Walmsley, K.; Morrison, S.; Kaye, J.; Gradwell, E.; Baker, M.

TI: Development of a spreadsheet for the calculation of new tools to improve the reporting of the resultsof medical research
AU: Shakespeare, Thomas; Gebski, Val; Thiagarajan, Anuradha; Jay Lu, Jiade

TI: Radiological clinical telesession: A cooperative working environment for sharing clinical experienceover the Internet
AU: Vega, J.; Rubio, V.; Espigado, P.; Asensio, J.; Vinao, M.; Esteban, E.; Gonzalez-Carpio, R.

TI: A web management service applied to a comprehensive characterization of Visible Human Dataset colour images
AU: Menegoni, Francesco; Pinciroli, Francesco

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E-Learning & Health Informatics Conference at UWE

Today I attended a conference organised by the Faculty of Health and Social Care at the University of the West of England on E-learning and Health Informatics.

Proceedings were opened by Professor Rob Cuthbert, Deputy Vice Chancellor, who was followed by Professor Richard McCLatchey who described work on the EU funded Health-e-child project, a grid based project aiming to bring biomedical informatics into the clinical domain for paediatricians. He described the scope of the project and the use of grid computing.

The next speaker was Dr Martin Dyke from the Graduate school of Education at Southampton. He described their research group, approach to pedagogy and some current research projects. Much of the presentation examined the gap between the potential of the technology in education and the application and the tensions between passive and active learning and individual against societal learning. He described and demonstrated a real time, high end video system for the assessment of teaching students with remote camera control. He finished with an upbeat message about a "Fusion of Learning horizons".

Liz Falconer gave an overview of national strategies and priorities for elearning at a national level (JISC, DfES, HEA & research councils) and local (UWE) level. She described a range of strategies and practical tools which influence development.

The final speaker of the morning was Rob Bampfylde who described an demonstrated a range of web and mobile applications eg RSS, PDA, mobile phone, MP3 player etc) with applications for elearning.

It will be interesting to see how the developments talked about are put into practice.

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what vaccines are all about?? Dr Hilleman - MMR

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some noble and honorable people didn`t get what they want..... as enemy of child infections....

Dr Hilleman wanted the vaccines to be delivered to maximize the chances that more children would receive them.

Dr Adel Mahmoud, President of Merck Vaccines, recalled how this affected Dr Hilleman :-

"It saddened him to see that knowledge was twisted in such a way to play in the hands of the anti-vaccine movement and not really appreciate what vaccines are all about.

"They are about protection of individual, but also protection of the society so you achieve 'herd immunity'.

"Maurice believed in that and it really pained him a lot to see what was happening in the UK."


BBC story :- [link]

Kevin, MD story [link]

Thanx Dr Hilleman

Monday, June 26, 2006

PAC quiz CfH


HoC Committee of Public Accounts - The national programme for IT in the NHS


Today the House of Commons Public Accounts Committee quizzed senior staff from NHS Connecting for Health in connection with the National Audit Office report which was published recently.

Witnesses included; Sir Ian Carruthers OBE, Acting Chief Executive, Mr Richard Granger, Director General of IT, NHS, and Mr Richard Jeavons, Director of IT Service Implementation, Department of Health, Dr Anthony Nowlan, Professor Peter Hutton, Muir Gray, Gillian Braunold, Mark Davis etc.

The chair suggested that central imposition on a complex and diverse NHS might be a risky path! and questioned the delays in publication. Other questions related to confidentiality and security and the lack of clinical involvement v "dictat from above". There seemed to be major disagreements between Peter Hutton and Richard Granger.

I've not managed to watch all 2 hours plus but you can watch it (possibly only for this week) by following the link to
HoC Committee of Public Accounts - The national programme for IT in the NHS
Monday 4.30 pm and click watch from start.

questioning included comments about delays in delivery, clinical involvement, budgets etc and some comments from the press recently and worries that the National Audit Office report had not been as hard hitting as it should have been. Because a lot of committee members were present and they were restricted in the time available with some answer being promised in future notes.

See also:

BBC News report which focuses on Muir Gray's comments about risk.

NPfIT scrutinised by Public Accounts Committee - EHealth Insider

CfH accused of 'sham' on clinical consultation - EHealth Insider

Unanswered questions on NHS IT - ComputerWeekly.com


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Evidence for handheld electronic medication records in improving care: a systematic review

Evidence for handheld electronic medication records in improving care: a systematic review

This paper by Robert C Wu and Sharon E Straus, which is available from BioMed Central as a provisional PDF, reports a systematic review of 30 years of literature on the evidence assessing the effects of handheld electronic medical records on clinical care.

only two studies met the inclusion criteria. Both studies were methodologically strong. The studies examined changes in documentation in orthopedic patients with handheld electronic medical records compared to paper charts, and both found an increase in documentation. Other effects noted with handheld electronic medical records were an increase in time to document and an increase in wrong or redundant diagnoses.

The authors concluded that "Handheld electronic medical records may improve documentation, but as yet, the number of studies is small and the data is restricted to one group of patients and a small group of practitioners. Further study is required to determine the benefits with handheld electronic medical records especially in assessing clinical outcomes."

This just shows the dearth of good research in the area and the need for further work before this sort of approach is adopted more widely.

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Sunday, June 25, 2006

Medical Videos at youtube.com

Medical Videos in youtube.com got special stuff ...some of it just shots in classroom , or Medical Demonstration , sometimes you notice some educational stuff ..not that good .
Dr-Rich gives medical advice.. "about 73 sec"

IV !!!

Tips from a Med School Student - Flu Shot Myths


notes :-
  • many of those videos added months ago
  • mainly no comments
  • Views :- few
how youtube.com could use to help medical education? that`s the point! "soon"
Hamza Mousa
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Saturday, June 24, 2006

Stolen DB of Kidney Transplant Program Records !!

by Catherine Calacanis at www.medicalinformaticsinsider.com i read about that matter , it`s not about security matter but who made this and why? and what he or "them" will or can get?
  • Who are they? .. do they work for some sort of company? or alone just need some security Data from it? could be useful in blackmaling - getting info about donors?
  • thought of turning it to some sort of trade
  • nearly to 10,000 patients!! ..what`s the position the patients?what`s Guarantee they can get later?
  • is that matter will slow down the program? or there is BackUp data?
  • Dealing with those thieves how should be? as Local crime or International Crime? or Just Data stolen crime as usuall?
  • if those data using for Medical Trade ! how the doctors involved in should be treated?
  • it`s not just up to the security , also up to the laws.and way to treat thas type of health crimes
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Hamza Mousa

Why Are Health Care Interventions Delivered Over the Internet? A Systematic Review of the Published Literature

Journal of Medical Internet Research - Why Are Health Care Interventions Delivered Over the Internet? A Systematic Review of the Published Literature

This paper, by Frances Griffiths, Antje Lindenmeyer, John Powell, Pam Lowe, and Margaret Thorogood, which has just been published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, reports a systematic reviewwhich set out "to review the reasons why health interventions have been delivered on the Internet and to reflect on the work of the pioneers in this field in order to inform future research".

The researchers tried to examine the effects on clinical practice and cost from 28 interventions and 9 interventions from pilot studies.

They concluded that "Internet delivery overcomes isolation of time, mobility, and geography, but it may not be a substitute for face-to-face contact".

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Friday, June 23, 2006

Medical informatics – health informatics – Definitions – thought – terminology

Seeking the web about medical informatics and health informatics in separte search process I get different results, so what's the difference?

Definitions:-

Health Informatics is ... the use of computer technologies in healthcare to store, share, transmit and analyze clinical knowledge and data.

But

Medical Informatics is :- scientific field that deals with biomedical information, data, and knowledge - their storage, retrieval, and optimal use for problem solving and decision making. It accordingly touches on all basic and applied fields in biomedical science and is closely tied to modern information technologies, notably in the areas of computing and communication (medical computer science).

My thoughts :-

  • Medical Informatics is part of Health Informatics
  • Health informatics in the broad name deals with info .. for many users levels like Patients , ordinary people , Medical related and of course doctors , it`s about how to deal with the health and medical info , using IT and that's means .. Communication – Info Transferring –
  • Is that few stuff need special care , of course .. many of medical sites still got old information with no updates , many of them not that updatable ..and no indexing for article .."categorized or tagged" and no simple basics of medical archiving …"solution is blogs like systems"
  • Medical informatics as medical computer science will include " Desktop applications – Pocket ,PDA, Palm & mobile applications – Web Applications" of course Freeware , Shareware .. using same IT licenses as any software.
  • This basic categorization of IT categories dose not include the medical ones like ? –image analysis tools –DB applications like medical recording system or Billing systems– Medical calculators – Medical Statistical systems – etc.
  • Most important features should included in those kind of software –Simplicity , Easy navigation , support and easy interface …that`s features you could name it Time saver …(simplicity here dosn`t mean weakness of the system look at google.com).
  • After time saver features what about the scientific aims? Lets take an example of Medical billing systems .. those kind of DB applications could use to get Medical statistical info could be useful for Researches , companies ..and Geov.

That`s just some of my thoughts … i`ll add some later about open sources systems and scientific value soon

Terminology:-

Some terms :-

Hamza Mousa


Thursday, June 22, 2006

BCS & RCN respond to NAO report on NPfIT

Further comment and analysis on the National Audit Office report in the NHS's National Programme for IT has been flowing....

E-Health Insider editor Jon Hoeksma have provided a more detailed critique of the NAO report into NPfIT's progress, and how far it covers clinicians' concerns, under the title Healthy optimism?

The British Computer Society (BCS) has written a press release BCS Notes that Nursing IT Skills are Vital to National Programme, according to National Audit Office Report which says:

Nursing IT skills and involvement are vital to the success of the National Project for IT according to a recent National Audit Office (NAO) report, which has been welcomed by the British Computer Society (BCS) and the Royal College of Nursing.

According to the joint BCS Health Informatics (Nursing) Group / RCN response to the report, many nurses at present lack the skills necessary to engage with the developments that the project will bring. The importance that the report places on education to ensure that all nurses have access to these opportunities is considered vital to the ultimate success of the project and has been widely praised by both organizations.

Dame June Clark, (Chair of RCN Information in Nursing Forum) said 'Nurses are the largest single professional grouping in the NHS, and are key to the success of the programme. Lack of involvement in the specification and design of the systems will mean that the systems will fail to “fit”, much less support, nursing practice, and therefore risk being rejected by nurses

Also highlighted is a call for organisations within the NHS to play their part fully in implementing the programme’s systems; a key priority that must utilise nurses and their skills to ensure that clinically credible, safe and effective systems are introduced across the NHS.

In conclusion, the response states that ‘winning the support of staff is vital, and with nurses consisting of largest single professional group in the NHS, their involvement is vital. The National Project for IT is a great opportunity for improving the patient experience and revolutionising the way that care is delivered in the 21st century. With transparency and a constructive dialogue between clinical staff and NHS Connecting for Health, the investment will be worthwhile’.


For further information contact:
Keith Mclaren
Deputy PR Manager & Press Officer
The British Computer Society
Tel: 01793 417637
Mail: keith.mclaren@hq.bcs.org.uk
Web: www.bcs.org

The British Computer Society (BCS) is the industry body for IT professionals and a Chartered Engineering Institution for Information Technology.
The BCS is responsible for setting standards for the IT profession. It is also leading the change in public perception and appreciation of the economic and social importance of professionally managed IT projects and programmes. In this capacity, the Society advises, informs and persuades industry and government on successful IT implementation.

This was based on a "A joint response to the National Audit Office report on The National Programme for IT in the NHS by the British Computer Society Health Informatics (Nursing) Specialist Group and the Royal College of Nursing."

Nurses broadly welcome the NAO report into NPfIT programme.

Richard Hayward (Chair of BCS Health Informatics (Nursing) Specialist Group) said "It is important that we look to how to make the programme a success in the future rather than focus on the failings of the past. The need for Clinical engagement and leadership is emphasised in the report. Since many nurses at present lack the skills necessary to engage with these developments, we welcome and support the importance that the report places on education and look to the NHS to ensure that all nurses have access to these opportunities.

Dame June Clark, (Chair of RCN Information in Nursing Forum) said 'Nurses are the largest single professional grouping the NHS, and are key to the success of the programme. Lack of involvement in the specification and design of the systems will mean that the systems will fail to “fit”, much less support, nursing practice, and therefore risk being rejected by nurses. Moreover, since nursing is critical to patient outcomes, it is critical that the EHR contains appropriate nursing data; without it outcomes cannot be properly identified, or patient safety improved. What is needed now is a real commitment to involving nurses in the programme and major investment in education.”

The British Computer Society Health Informatics (Nursing) Specialist Group and the Royal College of Nursing IN Group broadly welcome the National Audit Office Report published on 16th June 2006. It is acknowledged that the report is mostly retrospective, exploring the procurement phase and cannot explore the future value for money.

"The main implementation phase of the programme and the realisation of benefits are mainly a matter for the future and it will therefore be some time before it is possible to fully assess the value for money of the programme.”

The report praises NHS Connecting for Health for the speed of procurement and whilst this is acknowledged, it is questioned if clinical involvement was sacrificed in the achievement of this speed. The skills required for procurement are very different from those of implementation. Change management and redefining how healthcare is delivered will need to be explored in detail to ensure that patient care is of the highest order. Financial constraints and cost savings must be secondary to improvements in the patient experience.

The report makes 3 key recommendations:

• Ensuring that the IT suppliers continue to deliver systems that meet the needs of the NHS, and to agreed timescales without further slippage.

• Ensuring that NHS organisations can and do fully play their part in implementing the Programme’s systems.

• Winning the support of NHS staff and the public in making the best use of the systems to improve services.

Suppliers will need to work closely with clinicians as well as NHS Connecting for Health to ensure that implementation is effective in supporting frontline staff. The role of the Clinical Leads is identified as a positive influence and it is suggested that this should be made a full time post for Nursing, given the importance of dissemination highlighted by the report.

Ensuring that NHS organisations fully play their part in implementing the programmes systems is a key priority that must utilise nurses and their skills to ensure that clinically credible, safe and effective systems are introduced across the NHS. There is an apparent perception that the programme is focused on the provision of systems for acute hospital trusts, and indeed the implementation has been patchier in this sector. There has been a great deal of successful provision in the primary care sector, although access to this by community nurses in particular continues to be problematic.

Winning the support of staff is vital, and nurses are key to this as the largest single professional group in the NHS. Champions must be found to support the clinical leads in celebrating the successes of the programme. It is too easy to find fault in a programme of this size and highlighting the benefits both to staff and patients in terms of improved outcomes must be a priority to ensure that there is support from clinical staff across the NHS and private sector. This must be reinforced by transparency in the timetable of roll out from NHS Connecting for Health

The report highlights that

“The Department, NHS organisations and NHS Connecting for Health should put in place training and development programmes to strengthen capability, including project management and IT skills available to the wider NHS, continuing its work with the Office of Government Commerce.
The shortage of such skills is an immediate risk to the timely implementation of the Programme, and strengthening capacity in these areas will be a long-term asset for the NHS.”

In a time of difficult financial constraints, education and training tend to be low on the list of priorities. The emphasis place on the need for continuing education is welcomed and supported wholeheartedly by both groups.

The Health Minister Lord Warner told the national local medical committees’ conference that a task force would be set up to speed up the delivery of the National Care Records Service and improve clinical engagement. He said that the taskforce will be chaired by a layperson and involve a cross section of clinical representatives including deputy chief medical officer Professor Martin Marshall and will develop a “detailed implementation plan” for speeding up delivery of the NCRS.

Lord Warner told the conference: “I understand fully the concerns and reservations some doctors have about electronic patient records. We will fully consult with all professional interests and patients on the nature of the summary record and the confidentiality safeguards. But now is the time for leadership in this area and by that I mean clinical leadership as well.”

It is imperative that this taskforce represents all interested parties: suppliers, clinical staff including nurses and the professions allied to medicine as well as doctors, professional bodies as well as NHS Connecting for Health staff.

This is a great opportunity for improving the patient experience and revolutionising the way that care is delivered in the 21st century. With transparency and a constructive dialogue between clinical staff and NHS Connecting for Health, the investment will be worthwhile.

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Wednesday, June 21, 2006

UK NAO report on NPfIT in the NHS

UK National Audit Office press notice - National Programme for IT in the NHS

Following last Friday's release of the long awaited report from the National Audit Office on the National Programme for IT in the NHS, it has been interesting to watch how the media have commented.

The report itself was remarkably upbeat about the progress of NPfIT in placing massive contracts with IT suppliers and software development, relating to overspending and timesclaes - although it did contain some crticisms of the progress in involving clinicians.

E-Health Insider suggested that NAO gives positive account of NHS CfH reporting that " According to the eagerly awaited National Audit Office report published today the DH and NHS Connecting for Health, the agency responsible for the NHS IT project, have “made substantial progress” but the project remains very much a work in progress and it is too early to judge success.

The report confirms that areas of the programme are running late including Choose and Book already a year overdue, and the NHS Care Records Service so far two years late." However some of the comments from users of the site are less complimentary!

The BBC News story Major NHS IT upgrade hit by delay included comments that "The NAO report said that, while the costs of delays were being borne by private sector companies contracted to provide services, their impact could dent confidence in the programme." and sugested "NHS staff did not feel involved in the implementation of the programme - with three out of 10 unaware it was happening."

The Guardian report Cost of NHS IT programme 'to double' focused on costs, suggesting was news was expected; "The cost of setting up the vast NHS IT programme is expected to be double the government's original estimate, parliament's spending watchdog said today. But the National Audit office's cost projection is likely to be a relief for the Department of Health, as the cost of the project has previously been predicted to top £20bn."

Kable also commented on costs in it's report NAO says NPfIT costs £12.4bn and also carried the 3 areas in which development is needed; "The report also identifies three key areas which CfH, the NHS and the Department of Health (DoH) need to address in implementing the programme. One is to ensure that IT suppliers continue to deliver systems that meet the needs of the NHS to agreed timescales. It urges CfH to impose contractual penalties on suppliers who fail to meet schedules, as it has already done in some cases, and even to terminate contracts if necessary. Secondly, it needs to ensure NHS organisations play a full part in implementing the systems. Thirdly, it depends on engaging NHS staff who have shown significant concerns about the speed and clarity of the programme. Success depends on "winning the support of the NHS staff and the public in making the best use of systems to improve service", and the DoH and CfH "should provide greater clarity to organisations and staff in the NHS as to when the different elements of the programme will be delivered".

The times story Bugs in the system covered the report succicntly in it's sub head "The world’s biggest IT project has yet to prove it is good for the health".

The Telegraph "True cost of delayed NHS system is £12.4bn" also focused on cost.

Computer Weekly NHS National Programme for IT faces ‘significant challenges’ suggested that a key outcome of the report was a call for "the Department of Health and NHS Connecting for Health to offer greater clarity to the NHS on the programme’s timescales".

TechWorld ut a more positive gloss on it within it's story An NHS IT success story focusing on PACS - Picture Archiving and Communications Systems.

Tola Sargeant in a piece for Ovum summarised the report as UK's healthcare programme passes its check-up

It will be interesting to see further fall out from the report and over the next few months which of the predictions come true.

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NursingWiki

Main Page - NursingWiki

The growth of Wikis as a method of collaboration has been quite spectacular following the success of Wikipedia the online encyclopedia and the growth of Clininfowiki, the latest one which has been pointed out to me is NursingWiki, which also uses MediaWiki software.

There isn't much content on NursingWiki yet and provides an opportunity to get in there and tailor it to a particular community but it does show the way in which these sorts of technologies are expanding.

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Monday, June 19, 2006

Digg like medical System


Digg Like News system .for medical news
the Power of Digg style in news system ...Browsing - rating - searching - comments and Top stories..

another Great feature it`s any user can submit story...

how to browse the stories?
  • Browse the stories by Top stories
  • Browse the stories by categories
  • or by User


Friday, June 16, 2006

eHealth Literacy Skills

Journal of Medical Internet Research - eHealth Literacy: Essential Skills for Consumer Health in a Networked World

This interesting paper, by Cameron D Norman and Harvey A Skinner, has just been published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research. They define the concept of eHealth literacy "as the ability to seek, find, understand, and appraise health information from electronic sources and apply the knowledge gained to addressing or solving a health problem".

The authors identify an outline set of fundamental skills consumers require to derive direct benefits from eHealth and a case study approach to ilustrate how these can be used.

This is an important area and the model presented may be useful to stimulate further work.

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Medical Informatics and the Internet in Medicine 31(2) June 2006

Medical Informatics and the Internet in Medicine 31(2) June 2006

This latest issue of this journal has now been published, it contains:

Mobile healthcare informatics
Keng Siau, Zixing Shen

A semantically enabled formalism for the knowledge management of Parkinson's disease
S. Paul, A. Kokossis, H. Gage, L. Storey, R. Lawrenson, P. Trend, K. Walmsley, S. Morrison, J. Kaye, E. Gradwell, M. Baker

Development of a spreadsheet for the calculation of new tools to improve the reporting of the resultsof medical research
Thomas P. Shakespeare, Val J. Gebski, Anuradha Thiagarajan, Jiade Jay Lu

Radiological clinical telesession: A cooperative working environment for sharing clinical experienceover the Internet
J. M. Vega, V. J. Rubio, P. Espigado, J. Asensio, M. Viñao, E. Esteban, R. Gonzalez-Carpio

A web management service applied to a comprehensive characterization of Visible Human Dataset colour images
Francesco Menegoni, Francesco Pinciroli

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Saturday, June 03, 2006

NI2006



The 9th International Congress on Nursing Informatics (NI2006) starts next week in Soeul Korea, with a packed programme of workshops, tutorials, papers etc.

This major event happens once every three years and always provides an opportunity to learn about developments from around the world and meet up with friends and colleagues old and new.

I'm currently putting the finishing touches to the workshop and panel I'm participating in (my paper and the presentation for it are already done thankfully), and I fly in a few days.

Along with a team of colleagues we will be blogging live (or very nearly) on the conference blog & this year we will also have podcasts.

I look forward to seeing many of you there - if you can't join us in Soeul your comments and questions on the conference blog will be very welcome.


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Friday, June 02, 2006

Wikipedia developments

I have watched developments with Wikipedia, the online encyclopedia which anyone can edit, with interest since I edited my first page there in October 2004.

The willingness of individuals to devote time and effort to creating and editing articles means there are now over a million pages and quality mechanisms are also improving. Amongst my edits (see my user page) have been bits on Health Informatics, IMIA, NPfIT etc & now I've got involved with a Wiki Project aiming to improve the quality of articles about the NHS, and I would ask readers who might have something to add about a speciality, hospital, organisation etc to get involved and contribute.

A research study examining the use of the Semantic Web with Wikipedia was also pointed out to me last week at the WWW2006 conference. It will be interesting to see, with the current rate of change, how long before this sort of approach is implemented.


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Thursday, June 01, 2006

eHealth News EU - Google Trends and eHealth

eHealth News EU - Google Trends and eHealth:

Interesting post on the new eHealth News EU site. They used the new Google Trends tool to compare the terms "eHealth, Telemedicine, Medical Informatics and Health Informatics" in relation to the number of searches on Google. It's interesting to see that Telemedicine is search for more often than eHealth (however the gap is narrowing), but I have no explanation for St Albans leading the world for searching on these topics.

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Ward handover software

Headshift :: Usability testing in the wild

Interesting post from Stuart G Hall on the Headshift Blog reporting a meeting on Usability in which he describes a study of information handover by doctors and nurses on a paediatric ward. He points to The ACE Project - Information Appliances in Clinical Environments at City University which has developed a a prototype appliance to support shift handover arguing that this is "a good case for some kind of customised wiki/blog application which gives users a simple lightweight interface to capture that 'messy reality'?"

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