Informaticopia

Saturday, April 21, 2007

Shared Care Record workshop


Yesterday I attended an "Open Workshop" organised by the NHS Faculty of Health Informatics.

The workshop was led by Dr Gillian Braunold (Connecting for Health, National Clinical Lead for GPs) and provided an opportunity to explore a range of issues surrounding the Summary Care Record which is currently being piloted by Connecting for Health. This will provide an outline record for every NHS patient, initially based on a summary by their GP.

The event was held at Armada House in Bristol which provided easy access for me and was one of the first organised by the Faculty in the south of England.

The day was opened and chaired by Dr Paul Woolman who introduced the day by outlining the case for the SCR by citing references ranging from the US Institute of Medicine Preventing Medication Errors to the New Statesman supplement on IT and Modernisation (Oct 2006).

Gillian outlined her background and asked delegates to describe their role and what they wanted to get out of the workshop. She then described some of the lessons and issues from the early adopter sites (such as that in Bolton which was announced in March). She discussed some of the issues around opaqueness, delays and politics and compared the approach in England with that in Hampshire, The Wirral and Scotland who are "getting on with it". She also raised issues, which ran throughout the day, about consent, opt-in and opt-out models and sealed envelopes, which have been discussed on this blog and elsewhere (eg SCR opt-out sets 'onerous' conditions, says GP EHI).

Of the £12.4 billion budget for the National Programme for IT only a small percentage is being spend on the SCR, but Gillian described it as being one of the keys to making all of the work on sharing records come true.

The rationale for the inclusion of medications and allergies in the first uploads of records was described, and linked to work on security and confidentiality including Role Based Access Controls (RBAC), workgroups, "legitimate relationships" audits & alerts, and aspects of physical security including smartcards.

Issues about data quality within records were briefly touched on along with developments for patient access via HealthSpace, including e-gif level 3 security which is promised for May 2007.

After lunch David Nash gave a demonstration of the Clinical Spine Application (now renamed Summary Care Record) showing the view that a doctor in A&E may get to the data which has been uploaded from a GPs record. This raised lots of discussion about RBAC, overriding dissent etc. Demonstrators (both online and stand alone) of this functionality are being built.

Dr Chris Frith then discussed sharing records with patients in his surgery and gave a demonstration of the ways in which patients can do this via the surgery web site and EMiS access. He described the advantages of patient access as increasing trust and accuracy and reducing errors. The usage figures are still quite low bu8t some useful insights are being gained.

Another demonstration, which had been arranged at short notice, was by Brian Seaton, who showed his own medical record from a credit card USB drive using HealtheCard and discussed the layout and cost issues related to keeping the record up to date and accessing it (especially when NHS computers are having USB ports removed because of data slurping).

The final part of the day was workshop where delegates divided into groups to consider some of the issues around business processes and consent models which are being raised by this work and still being grappled with.

Generally the day was quite a useful opportunity to learn about the latest developments and explore some of the ongoing issues, which are important for everyone whether healthcare professionals or patients. It will be interesting to see what the effects of the public information campaigns in early adopter areas will be and how many of the current proposals are still in place ina years time.

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Wednesday, March 28, 2007

ECDL module for health

The British Computer Society recently announced a new module to be added to the European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL) specifically for healthcare staff, and developed in conjunction with Connecting for Health.

It aims to "provide candidates with an understanding of the key principles and policies relating to healthcare information systems and the practical skills needed by users. As well as enabling users to read, retrieve, update and store patient records accurately, the unit also provides candidates with a thorough understanding of the key issues regarding patient confidentiality and data security."

It has been piloted with 100 staff quite successfully but it will be interesting to see if this is rolled across the NHS and whether it is seen as a high priority for managers and useful for individual staff.

For More info:
BCS develops ECDL for NHS from Kable
BCS Develops New ECDL Health Unit for NHS from eGov Monitor


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